All posts tagged: minimalism

Project 333

Have you ever noticed how you tend to wear the same handful of things despite owning an entire closet full of clothes? It feels like you don’t have a lot of options, even if you actually do. I tend to gravitate towards my “favorite” clothes, and wear only a select few items consistently from week to week. That’s why I decided to try out Courtney Carver’s minimalist fashion experiment, Project 333. If you’re unfamiliar with Project 333, I give a brief rundown about the project in my most recent post about Getting Started with Minimalism. Project 333 is, essentially, a fashion “experiment” (as a scientist, I use the word “experiment” loosely). Well… it’s more of a fashion challenge. The challenge is to have only 33 articles of clothing in your wardrobe over the course of 3 months. Sounds challenging, right? It means that you have to get creative with the clothing in your selected wardrobe. I’m always up for an interesting challenge, so I’m going to give this one a try. This challenge is interesting …

Getting Started with Minimalism

So, you’re interested in starting minimalism. That’s fantastic! But what’s the best way to get started implementing minimalism into your life? It certainly seems like a daunting task, and can be difficult to pinpoint the right place to start out. Luckily, there are many challenges and methods, developed by professionals who practice minimalism, that are designed to help you get started. Here I’ll share some of the strategies that fellow minimalists have found to be the most helpful. Are you new to minimalism? I recommend you start here. Then, read on to discover three of the most popular minimalism challenges today, and my honest opinion for each. 1. The KonMari Method The KonMari Method was developed by Marie Kondo, author of The Life-Changing Method of Tidying Up. She also stars in the Netflix series, Tidying Up with Marie Kondo. The KonMari Method is designed to help you declutter, simplify and reorganize your home by eliminating the things that do not spark joy. The KonMari Method is effective because it urges you to tidy by category, …

Minimalism

It’s no secret that we live in a consumer-driven world. It’s increasingly difficult to go about everyday life without encountering some form of advertisement. Whether it’s a logo, a commercial, or a brand promotion on Instagram, everywhere you go, someone is trying to sell you something. There’s nothing inherently wrong with advertisements, but more often than not, we buy things that we don’t need, because we’re led to believe that we need them. Have you ever been guilty of buying something under the false notion that it will, for one reason or another, augment some aspect of your life? Odds are, you have. Don’t feel bad about it! It’s so easy to get caught in the figurative consumerism trap, because society tells us that in order to be successful, we need the big house and fancy car and everything else that goes along with achieving the “American Dream”. But here’s the thing. The true meaning of the American Dream, the ideal in which any American citizen can have equal opportunity to find success and achieve …

5 Beauty Products I No Longer Buy

If you are an urban dwelling student or young professional like me, odds are we suffer from the same consequences: things are generally more expensive, and space for things is limited. Or maybe you don’t live in the city, but you’re finding that you spend way too much time (or money) on the process of getting ready in the morning. I’ve found that I could seriously limit the amount of beauty products in my home to make my mornings easier. The less I buy, the more money and free space I have. I found that beauty products was one of the easiest categories to minimize because I could easily pinpoint what I actually use and need each day. I’ve been able to save lots of money by replacing some of my products with multi-functional or reusable items. As you read through this, start to consider the similar changes that you can make, too. Look at the products that you use on a daily basis (or more importantly, the products you don’t use). Look at their ingredients. Are …